It’s Finally Here – Our Spring Lecture!

On Thursday, April 17th, 6:30 PM, Dr. William Parkinson (Field Museum of Natural History) will deliver the public lecture, “Into The Mani: Multidisciplinary Archaeological Research in Diros Bay, Mani Peninsula, Southern Greece”. The lecture will be held at the List Art Building Room 110 on the Brown University campus.

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Dr. Parkinson writes, “Situated on the western shore of the Mani Peninsula on the southern Greek mainland is a massive cave that several thousand years ago was the site of a substantial early agricultural village. Alepotrypa Cave (Fox Hole Cave) is nearly half a kilometer deep, contains a cathedral-like main chamber, various smaller chambers, and a large freshwater lake. The cave also preserves several meters of archaeological deposits that date to the Neolithic Period (7,500-5,000 years ago) suggesting that it was home to some of the earliest farmers in Europe. People also came from distant places throughout the Aegean to bury their dead inside the cave. The remains of pottery, animals, and humans located on the surface of the cave floor suggest that the cave entrance collapsed at the beginning of the Bronze Age and that some individuals were trapped inside. The cave, which is a veritable Neolithic Pompeii, was discovered in 1958, but it is not widely known outside of Greece.”

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We look forward to seeing you there!

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Announcing the Fall 2013 Norton Lecture!

Stewart 2013

Please join us on 3 OCTOBER 2013 for the lecture “‘Go tell the Spartans . . .’ Representing War and the Warrior in Ancient Greece (ca. 800-450 BC)”.

TIME: 6:30 pm

VENUE: Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World (Rhode Island Hall, Brown University)

We’ll be hearing from Andrew Stewart, who is Professor of Ancient Mediterranean Art and Archaeology in the Departments of History of Art and Classics, Nicholas C. Petris Professor of Greek Studies, and Curator of Mediterranean Archaeology at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley.

Dr. Stewart says, “This lecture explores some aspects of the representation of war and warriors in archaic and early classical Greece (ca. 800-450 B.C.). I begin by introducing the Greek warrior ethic, then discuss the phalanx and its representations, and then move to the popular but puzzling figure of the solitary hoplite. Since archaic Greek warfare was a mass affair where formation and discipline counted for everything, the solitary hoplite is both an anomaly and an anachronism. Or is he? Next, I address the ever-present specter of death and the warrior’s code of honor, with a side-glance at his memorialization in funerary sculpture. Finally, I turn to the Persian Wars (490-479) and the battle imagery generated in response to them.”

 

Further Reading:

Dover, K. 1978, 1989. Greek Homosexuality. Cambridge, Mass.

Hanson, V.D. 1989. The Western Way of War: Infantry Battle in Classical Greece. New York.

Hanson, V.D. (ed.). 1991. Hoplites. The Classical Greek Battle Experience. New York.

Hornblower, S., and A. Spawforth. 2012. The Oxford Classical Dictionary 4  “Hoplites”, “Phalanx”, and “Warfare, Greek.”

Lendon, J.E. 2005. Soldiers and Ghosts. A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity. New Haven.

Pomeroy, S. B., Burstein, S., Donlan, W., and J.T. Roberts. 2004. A Brief History of Ancient Greece. Oxford. Pp. 36-137.

Stewart, A. 1996. Art, Desire, and the Body in Ancient Greece. Cambridge. Pp. 86-97.

Wees, H. van. 2004. Greek Warfare: Myths and Realities. London.