It’s Finally Here – Our Spring Lecture!

On Thursday, April 17th, 6:30 PM, Dr. William Parkinson (Field Museum of Natural History) will deliver the public lecture, “Into The Mani: Multidisciplinary Archaeological Research in Diros Bay, Mani Peninsula, Southern Greece”. The lecture will be held at the List Art Building Room 110 on the Brown University campus.

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Dr. Parkinson writes, “Situated on the western shore of the Mani Peninsula on the southern Greek mainland is a massive cave that several thousand years ago was the site of a substantial early agricultural village. Alepotrypa Cave (Fox Hole Cave) is nearly half a kilometer deep, contains a cathedral-like main chamber, various smaller chambers, and a large freshwater lake. The cave also preserves several meters of archaeological deposits that date to the Neolithic Period (7,500-5,000 years ago) suggesting that it was home to some of the earliest farmers in Europe. People also came from distant places throughout the Aegean to bury their dead inside the cave. The remains of pottery, animals, and humans located on the surface of the cave floor suggest that the cave entrance collapsed at the beginning of the Bronze Age and that some individuals were trapped inside. The cave, which is a veritable Neolithic Pompeii, was discovered in 1958, but it is not widely known outside of Greece.”

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We look forward to seeing you there!

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International Archaeology Day and Young Archaeologists’ Day 2013 Recap

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This past Saturday, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology & the Ancient World at Brown University opened its doors in celebration of International Archaeology Day.  AIA Narragansett organized a range of events and activities, including a stratigraphy station; an artifact lab featuring pottery, coins, glass, and figures; and a bone lab with human and animal skeletons. We also welcomed young archaeologists in grades 7-12 (and some much younger!) for Young Archaeologists’ Day. Outside, the Archaeology of College Hill class was excavating the home of Brown’s first president and accepting volunteers; we also set up an area where visitors could take part in reconstructing the footprint of ancient homes.  And of course, the Haffenreffer Museum also had a full day of events.

Here are some of our favorite photos from the day.

Stratigraphy

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Graduate students Alba and Lexi prepare the stratigraphy station-an essential first stop for understanding archaeology!

Artifact Lab

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Postdoctoral fellow and AIA Narragansett co-president Fotini shows pottery to a young archaeologist.
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Graduate student Emily is preparing to handle some Ancient Egyptian figurines.

 

Bone Lab

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Postdoctoral fellow and AIA Narragansett co-president Suzanne and undergraduate senior Simon show animal bones to visitors.
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Graduate students Alyce and Fernando talk human osteology.

Archaeology of College Hill

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Students and volunteers dig the Archaeology of College Hill!

Of course, none of the great activities above would have been possible without the help of our volunteers-who came from the departments in Archaeology, Anthropology, History of Art, Classics, and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies. If you attended and enjoyed the day and would like to be notified of future upcoming events, please consider supporting your local AIA chapter by joining the AIA and selecting “AIA Narragansett“.

Thanks for a great day everyone-hope to see you next year!

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Join us for International Archaeology Day on October 19th!

Who

The International Archaeology Day events are free and open to the public. We are also inviting young archaeologists in grades 7-12 to participate in Young Archaeologists’ Day.

Where 

Indoors at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Brown University and outside on the Quiet Green (behind the Institute-for directions, click here).

When

Saturday, 19th October, from 10AM-2PM (indoor events) and 10AM-4PM (College Hill excavation)

What

As part of International Archaeology Day, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World at Brown University will be having an “Open Day”. Visit this historic building and view a number of interesting small exhibits from their  collections.

AIA Narragansett has organized several activities throughout the building, including:

Welcome Area: Information and light refreshments (main foyer)
The Bone Lab: Experts will be on hand to show specimens and talk about how we answer complex archaeological questions using human and animal remains. (seminar room)
The Material Culture Lab: Meet our experts on coins and pottery and find out about daily life in the ancient world. (mezzanine)
Young Archaeologists’ Day: Young archaeologists grades 7-12 are invited to join us for lunch from 12-2 to find out more about archaeology and how they can get involved. (common room)
Build an Ancient House: Help lay out floorplans of houses from different civilizations, from ancient Egypt to Greece and Rome. (outdoors; quiet green)
College Hill excavation: Stop by Brown University’s search for the home of the first university President, from 10-4PM. (outdoors; quiet green)

Don’t forget to stop by the Haffenreffer Museum, who also have a great range of activities planned.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Have questions? Don’t hesitate to get in touch with us at aia.narragansett.society@gmail.com or on Twitter: @NarragansettAIA.

Field Dirt and the William F. Church Memorial Lecture

Here at AIA Narragansett we’ve just heard of two interesting events that are free and open to the public that we would like to share.

On Wednesday, 11 September 2013Field Dirt: Insider Stories and Results from Brown’s 2013 Archaeological Field Seasons will feature talks by Susan E. Alcock, Sheila Bonde, John F. Cherry, Omur Harmansah, Felipe Rojas, Andrew Scherer, and Peter van Dommelen on their archaeological fieldwork this summer in Jordan, France, Montserrat, Turkey, Mexico, and Italy.

On Tuesday, 24 September 2013,  the 34th William F. Church Memorial Lecture will take place at the Salomon Center on the Brown University campus in room 001.

John Brewer (Eli and Edye Broad Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences, California Institute of Technology) will give a talk entitled “Vesuvius and Pompeii: travel, tourism, science and the imagination in the early nineteenth century”. A small reception will follow the lecture.

We hope to see you there!