Spring Lecture Line-Up

Happy 2015 to all of our members! With the new year comes a new group of talks. We currently have two great lectures lined-up that we are very excited about:

February 26: “Women, Children and Families in the Military Communities of the Western Roman Empire” given by Elizabeth Greene, University of Western Ontario. 6:30 pm in Room 108, Rhode Island Hall, Brown University.

April 8: “Pelargikon and Peripatos:  The Archaeology of Cult on the Slopes of the Athenian Acropolis” given by Kevin Glowacki, Texas A&M University.  6 pm in 105 Ruane Center, Providence College campus **This lecture will be held at Providence College.

Please check here for more updates, including talk abstracts, and our facebook page, which has all of our events activities (and is updated very frequently).

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International Archaeology Day and Young Archaeologists’ Day 2013 Recap

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This past Saturday, the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology & the Ancient World at Brown University opened its doors in celebration of International Archaeology Day.  AIA Narragansett organized a range of events and activities, including a stratigraphy station; an artifact lab featuring pottery, coins, glass, and figures; and a bone lab with human and animal skeletons. We also welcomed young archaeologists in grades 7-12 (and some much younger!) for Young Archaeologists’ Day. Outside, the Archaeology of College Hill class was excavating the home of Brown’s first president and accepting volunteers; we also set up an area where visitors could take part in reconstructing the footprint of ancient homes.  And of course, the Haffenreffer Museum also had a full day of events.

Here are some of our favorite photos from the day.

Stratigraphy

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Graduate students Alba and Lexi prepare the stratigraphy station-an essential first stop for understanding archaeology!

Artifact Lab

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Postdoctoral fellow and AIA Narragansett co-president Fotini shows pottery to a young archaeologist.
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Graduate student Emily is preparing to handle some Ancient Egyptian figurines.

 

Bone Lab

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Postdoctoral fellow and AIA Narragansett co-president Suzanne and undergraduate senior Simon show animal bones to visitors.
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Graduate students Alyce and Fernando talk human osteology.

Archaeology of College Hill

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Students and volunteers dig the Archaeology of College Hill!

Of course, none of the great activities above would have been possible without the help of our volunteers-who came from the departments in Archaeology, Anthropology, History of Art, Classics, and Egyptology and Ancient Western Asian Studies. If you attended and enjoyed the day and would like to be notified of future upcoming events, please consider supporting your local AIA chapter by joining the AIA and selecting “AIA Narragansett“.

Thanks for a great day everyone-hope to see you next year!

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Announcing the Fall 2013 Norton Lecture!

Stewart 2013

Please join us on 3 OCTOBER 2013 for the lecture “‘Go tell the Spartans . . .’ Representing War and the Warrior in Ancient Greece (ca. 800-450 BC)”.

TIME: 6:30 pm

VENUE: Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World (Rhode Island Hall, Brown University)

We’ll be hearing from Andrew Stewart, who is Professor of Ancient Mediterranean Art and Archaeology in the Departments of History of Art and Classics, Nicholas C. Petris Professor of Greek Studies, and Curator of Mediterranean Archaeology at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley.

Dr. Stewart says, “This lecture explores some aspects of the representation of war and warriors in archaic and early classical Greece (ca. 800-450 B.C.). I begin by introducing the Greek warrior ethic, then discuss the phalanx and its representations, and then move to the popular but puzzling figure of the solitary hoplite. Since archaic Greek warfare was a mass affair where formation and discipline counted for everything, the solitary hoplite is both an anomaly and an anachronism. Or is he? Next, I address the ever-present specter of death and the warrior’s code of honor, with a side-glance at his memorialization in funerary sculpture. Finally, I turn to the Persian Wars (490-479) and the battle imagery generated in response to them.”

 

Further Reading:

Dover, K. 1978, 1989. Greek Homosexuality. Cambridge, Mass.

Hanson, V.D. 1989. The Western Way of War: Infantry Battle in Classical Greece. New York.

Hanson, V.D. (ed.). 1991. Hoplites. The Classical Greek Battle Experience. New York.

Hornblower, S., and A. Spawforth. 2012. The Oxford Classical Dictionary 4  “Hoplites”, “Phalanx”, and “Warfare, Greek.”

Lendon, J.E. 2005. Soldiers and Ghosts. A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity. New Haven.

Pomeroy, S. B., Burstein, S., Donlan, W., and J.T. Roberts. 2004. A Brief History of Ancient Greece. Oxford. Pp. 36-137.

Stewart, A. 1996. Art, Desire, and the Body in Ancient Greece. Cambridge. Pp. 86-97.

Wees, H. van. 2004. Greek Warfare: Myths and Realities. London.