AIA Lecture March 2 – Stephen Batiuk

Please join us for our spring lecture, given by Dr. Stephen Batiuk (University of Toronto).  He will present a talk titled “The ‘Kingdom of Idols’: Recent Investigations at Tell Tayinat (Ancient Kunulua, Biblical Calno) in Southeastern Turkey.” See the end of this post for a lecture abstract.

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This lecture will take place Thursday, March 2, 2017, at 6:30 pm, in Room 108, Rhode Island Hall, Brown University. We hope to see you there!

Abstract:

The interplay between the Hebrew Bible and the archaeological record has all too often been a contentious affair, greatly dependent on how one understands its compositional history, as well as the cultural and geopolitical context in which it was written. This talk presents the latest results of the University of Toronto’s excavations at Tell Tayinat, ancient Kunulua (Biblical Calno), located in the North Orontes Valley in the southeastern province of Hatay in modern day Turkey. The lecture will focus on the Iron II-III levels (9th to 7thCentury) at the site, which record the changing fortunes of a Neo-Hittite Kingdom perched on the edge of the Assyrian Empire, and will explore how archaeological evidence from the Northern Levantine Royal city can shed light on the local history of a region, while also providing insight into the cultural environment in which the Biblical texts were written.

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AIA Kress Lecture April 21

On April 21st at 6:30 pm, we will hear from Dr. Lorenzo Nigro (Sapienza University of Rome) in a talk titled The Phoenicians at the World’s Ends: The Formation of Mediterranean Civilization as seen from the Island of Motya in Sicily. As usual, the lecture will take place in Room 108 Rhode Island Hall, Brown University, with a Q&A and reception to follow. See the abstract below for more information on Dr. Nigro’s talk. We hope to see you for what will be a very interesting lecture!

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Abstract:
“Fourteen seasons of excavations at Motya (2002-2015) revealed traces of the earliest Levantine and Phoenician habitation of the central Mediterranean, bringing to light the formative phase of Phoenician expansion to the West. The discovery of Building C8 and  a series of wells in the earliest settlement, matched with other recent finds in the Iberian Peninsula (Cadiz), North Africa (Utica, Carthage) and Sardinia (Sulky) have significantly transformed the history of the 2nd and1st millennium BC Mediterranean.

Examining the sea routes across the Mediterranean may help disentangle the intricate roots of our civilization—or suggest that a multicultural/ethnical approach is better for studying the historical scenario of the earliest centuries of the 1st millennium BC, when this enclosed sea became a melting pot for peoples and cultures.”

AIA Lecture November 13 – Dr. Jean Turfa

Join us on Thursday November 13 at 6:30 PM for a talk by Etruscan archaeologist Dr. Jean Turfa titled “Top śar (10) Recent Breakthroughs in Etruscan Archaeology.” See Dr. Turfa’s abstract below for more information. Q&A and reception will follow.

Also, remember to follow AIA Narragansett Society on twitter and facebook for live updates on lectures and events! We hope to see you next week!

 

 

Abstract:

You may not yet know it, but real Etruscans wore plaid, had to accommodate women drivers, built high-speed sailing ships, and availed themselves of quite sophisticated plumbing. You may not know it, but you just might be Etruscan – or be unwittingly using inventions the Etruscans (via Roman culture) gave us, such as the “Latin” alphabet, “Roman” numerals, and gabled wooden houses. Ten recent discoveries show how much our own culture relies on the breakthroughs of Etruscan innovators of the first millennium BC, and just how avant-garde this culture really was.

It’s Finally Here – Our Spring Lecture!

On Thursday, April 17th, 6:30 PM, Dr. William Parkinson (Field Museum of Natural History) will deliver the public lecture, “Into The Mani: Multidisciplinary Archaeological Research in Diros Bay, Mani Peninsula, Southern Greece”. The lecture will be held at the List Art Building Room 110 on the Brown University campus.

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Dr. Parkinson writes, “Situated on the western shore of the Mani Peninsula on the southern Greek mainland is a massive cave that several thousand years ago was the site of a substantial early agricultural village. Alepotrypa Cave (Fox Hole Cave) is nearly half a kilometer deep, contains a cathedral-like main chamber, various smaller chambers, and a large freshwater lake. The cave also preserves several meters of archaeological deposits that date to the Neolithic Period (7,500-5,000 years ago) suggesting that it was home to some of the earliest farmers in Europe. People also came from distant places throughout the Aegean to bury their dead inside the cave. The remains of pottery, animals, and humans located on the surface of the cave floor suggest that the cave entrance collapsed at the beginning of the Bronze Age and that some individuals were trapped inside. The cave, which is a veritable Neolithic Pompeii, was discovered in 1958, but it is not widely known outside of Greece.”

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We look forward to seeing you there!

You’re Invited: Our Winter 2014 Lecture on Pompeii

We are pleased to announce that Professor Theodore Peña (University of California, Berkeley) will be delivering the lecture “Investigating the life history of objects at Pompeii” on February 27th, 2014.

POMPEII AE&FE BUCKET 2

The lecture is free and open to the public. It will take place at the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology, Brown University, Room 108. Doors open at 5:45 PM and the talk will begin promptly at 6:30 PM. Light refreshments will be served.

The talk will center around the Pompeii Artifact Life History Project (PALHIP), presenting results from the first two field seasons in 2012 and 2013. The project seeks to add to our knowledge of life histories of Roman craft goods and use this towards understanding broader patterns of consumption in the Roman world. The talk will touch on topics such as production, distribution, acquisition, use and reuse, maintenance and disposal of craft goods at Pompeii before the great eruption of Vesuvius, using examples from the town and its surroundings.

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Finds from the site of Villa Regina a Boscoreale and Domus dei Casti Amanti (the House of the Chaste Lovers) will be discussed, and several of the objects will get their “close-up” as Professor Peña shows us how the evaluation of an artifact’s surface makes it possible to interpret its life history.

POMPEII AE&FE BUCKET 1

Professor Peña is currently a Professor in the Department of Classics at the University of California, Berkeley, and holds his degrees from the University of Michigan (Ph.D.) and Wesleyan University.  His research interests include the archaeology of Roman and pre-Roman Italy, ancient economy and economic archaeology, and ceramic studies.  Forthcoming publications include the Cambridge Handbook of Roman Pottery in the Mediterranean Basin (Cambridge University Press)

The following readings are suggested for those interested:

Peña, J.T. Roman pottery in the archaeological record. (2007).

Peña, J.T. and McCallum, M. “The production and distribution of pottery at Pompeii: a review of the evidence. Part 2: the material basis for pottery production and pottery distribution.” American Journal of Archaeology 113.2 (2009) 165-201.

Peña, J.T. and McCallum, M. “The production and distribution of pottery at Pompeii: a review of the evidence. Part 1: production.” American Journal of Archaeology 113.1 (2009) 57-79.

We hope to see many of you there!

Announcing the Fall 2013 Norton Lecture!

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Please join us on 3 OCTOBER 2013 for the lecture “‘Go tell the Spartans . . .’ Representing War and the Warrior in Ancient Greece (ca. 800-450 BC)”.

TIME: 6:30 pm

VENUE: Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World (Rhode Island Hall, Brown University)

We’ll be hearing from Andrew Stewart, who is Professor of Ancient Mediterranean Art and Archaeology in the Departments of History of Art and Classics, Nicholas C. Petris Professor of Greek Studies, and Curator of Mediterranean Archaeology at the Hearst Museum of Anthropology at the University of California at Berkeley.

Dr. Stewart says, “This lecture explores some aspects of the representation of war and warriors in archaic and early classical Greece (ca. 800-450 B.C.). I begin by introducing the Greek warrior ethic, then discuss the phalanx and its representations, and then move to the popular but puzzling figure of the solitary hoplite. Since archaic Greek warfare was a mass affair where formation and discipline counted for everything, the solitary hoplite is both an anomaly and an anachronism. Or is he? Next, I address the ever-present specter of death and the warrior’s code of honor, with a side-glance at his memorialization in funerary sculpture. Finally, I turn to the Persian Wars (490-479) and the battle imagery generated in response to them.”

 

Further Reading:

Dover, K. 1978, 1989. Greek Homosexuality. Cambridge, Mass.

Hanson, V.D. 1989. The Western Way of War: Infantry Battle in Classical Greece. New York.

Hanson, V.D. (ed.). 1991. Hoplites. The Classical Greek Battle Experience. New York.

Hornblower, S., and A. Spawforth. 2012. The Oxford Classical Dictionary 4  “Hoplites”, “Phalanx”, and “Warfare, Greek.”

Lendon, J.E. 2005. Soldiers and Ghosts. A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity. New Haven.

Pomeroy, S. B., Burstein, S., Donlan, W., and J.T. Roberts. 2004. A Brief History of Ancient Greece. Oxford. Pp. 36-137.

Stewart, A. 1996. Art, Desire, and the Body in Ancient Greece. Cambridge. Pp. 86-97.

Wees, H. van. 2004. Greek Warfare: Myths and Realities. London.